Then vs Than 

Then vs Than 

“Then” and “than” look and sound similar but they mean very different things. THEN is an adverb, referring to a certain time, or “when” something happened or will happen. For example: “Let’s meet at 3 pm.”  “Sounds good! I’ll see you then.” (“then” = 3 pm) “I had...

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When to Use IN, AT, and ON

When to Use IN, AT, and ON

The words IN, AT, and ON are a part of speech called prepositions. Prepositions express TIME or LOCATION for people, places, and things. The front page photo to this article shows a variety of uses of IN, AT, and ON. After reading this, you should be able to identify...

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How To Use “Recommend” Part 2

How To Use “Recommend” Part 2

Yesterday, her boss recommended (that) she read the document carefully. This sentence is correct and shows another way to use “recommend.” In that sentence, there are two verbs: recommend and read. The person recommending wants someone else to read something. The word...

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How To Use “Recommend” Part 1

How To Use “Recommend” Part 1

“Recommend” means to present someone as worthy of confidence or as something you might like. You might recommend a book, restaurant, company, employee, or friend to someone else. We often use “recommend” in business because the word carries an official-sounding weight...

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When to Use “Had Had”

When to Use “Had Had”

When French comedian Gad Elmaleh started learning English in 2016 to perform his standup act in New York, he found a lot to laugh about in the peculiarities of his new language – and using the verb “had had” was among them. In his live performance show, “American...

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February’s Pronunciation Practice: Silent Letters

February’s Pronunciation Practice: Silent Letters

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE: SILENT LETTERS (r, l, and s) In honor of the silent “r” in February, this month’s words all have silent letters (r, l, and s). Watch below ⬇️⬇️ and see the  February = FEB-yu-ware-i Lincoln = LINK’n Talk = tawk Walk = wawk Could = cood (the...

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How to spell capital or capitol

How to spell capital or capitol

Today is Inauguration day 2021. The ceremony takes place in the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., and the 46th president, Joe Biden, will be sworn in on the Capitol steps.  Which brings up the common confusion between the two words:  CAPITAL and CAPITOL The two...

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When Do I Use Lie vs Lay?

When Do I Use Lie vs Lay?

This may sound shocking, but there is no longer a distinction between “lie” and “lay.” Yes, there was a time -- 10, 20 or more years ago -- when using LIE or LAY showed the difference between good, standard English and “other.” But when the majority of native English...

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